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Posts Tagged ‘bully’

Beating The Bullies-Draw The Line On Bullying

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019

Are you afraid your child is being picked on by a bully in school? Do you know how to talk to your kids about bullying and methods for beating the bullies at their own game? How do you draw the line on bullying?  How do you and your child succeed at beating the bullies? Is bullying that bad?  YES.

Left unchecked, bullying can be disastrous for children and their self-esteem.  Some of the long term effects of bullying may lead to depression or make it hard to form lasting trusting relationships.

Bullies Cannot Be Allowed To Harm Our Kids

But as a caring adult, what can you do that will not make the situation worse?  You may very well think that playground bullying is between the children and adults should not get involved.  However, left unchecked, bullying will only escalate and your child will be left feeling vulnerable and unsafe.

Granted I am older that most parents who are dealing with this issue.  But, even when our kids were younger, bullying wasn’t much talked about. If teachers or parents saw a blatant case of bullying, they stepped in and put a stop to it – often with a smack to the head or a threat of one. Even if the smack was not delivered, most kids were scared enough of the principal and teachers that the abuse stopped.

Many times the teachers would look the other way when someone had the courage to confront the bully and fight it out behind the school.  That may very well happen today, but it is not condoned. Times have changed. As a society, we don’t discipline in that manner any longer.

Teachers and administrators are so afraid of a law suit that they frequently jump in too soon.

cyberbullying, protect children from bullies, online bullies, facebook bully, help for kids who are bullied

New ideas to help you and your child beat the bullies. Check out http://www.cyberbullyinghelp.com for more information. You will be glad you did.

 

New Way Of Responding To Bullies

Many schools practice some sort of “bullying control.”  I am familiar with Kelso’s Choice which is an excellent program for elementary schools.

One middle school I know, practices the concept of ‘the line.’ Individual students either operate above the line or below the line. Above–the-line behavior includes self-control and respect for others – especially respect for fellow students.

Below the line is the domain where the bully operates. Bullies don’t care so much about respecting others. Bullies choose to elevate them selves by putting others down. The bullies own lack of self-respect is most likely a root cause of their bullying behavior.

Let’s be clear, the bully is a leader who leads others below-the-line. The bully gains power when others follow. Without a following, the bully loses power.

Teach your children to pick up on what the bully says but to reply in a way that neutralizes the insult.  For example:

“You stink.”

“Yep, it is a new shampoo.  I think it smells great.”

Help them to understand they have a choice. Either choose to lead and live above the line or lead and live below the line.
Either choose to follow the leaders who operate above the line or follow the bullies who operate below the line.

Bullies Are Cowards

A great method for defussing bullying incidences is to ask the bully to “say it again.” Encourage your child to keep asking the bully to repeat the insult until it becomes less offensive. Since most bullies are cowards and lack the courage to repeat the insult and are more likely to tone it down.

Teach your kids to imagine themselves inside a protective bubble that bounces off bullies’ words.  If they practice visualizing this with you, they will be able to have some control in a potentially disempowering encounter.

Empower Your Child

 Make sure your children have chances to make friends and have successes away from where bullying takes place.  Try a drama group, sports club, band, or choir where the group provides a shared activity than can rebuild confidence eroded by bullies.

Share your comments and ideas at www.cyberbullyinghelp.com  You will also receive a two page list of resources to help beat the bully and draw the line on bullying.

Judy Helm Wright is an author, coach and parent educator.  Schedule a free consultation with her at http://www.judyhwright.com   You will be glad you did.

Startling Statistics About Bullying (EXPERT)

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

Some Facts About Bullying
Bullying is a huge problem for children in the United States and elsewhere. Recently I ran across a great info-graphic that explained some things about bullying. You can see it here: http://www.infographicsarchive.com/health-and-safety/infographic-the-truth-about-bullying/. The info-graphic shared some startling facts that I want to tell you about.
First of all, what is bullying? Well, according to the info-graphic, bullying is physical, verbal or psychological attacks or intimidation against a defenseless person.

Most kids do not tell their parents when they are being bullied or attacked by cyber-bullies. Please talk to your kids about the dangers of bullying. It is serious for the bullied, the bully and the by-stander. Please check out this book at http://www.ArtichokePress.com You will be glad you did.

In fact:
1. 1 out of every 4 kids are bullied every month in the United States
2. 160,000 kids miss school each day for fear of bullying
3. 1 in 10 children drops out of school due to bullying
4. Every 7 minutes a child is bullied
What qualifies as bullying?
• Hitting
• Threatening
• Name-Calling
• Intimidating
• Maliciously Teasing and Taunting
• Making Sexual Remarks
• Stealing or Damaging Belongings
• Indirect Attacks Such as Spreading Rumors
• Encouraging Others to Reject or Exclude Someone
Where does bullying take place and who is being bullied?
1. 85% of bullying occurs inside of school
2. 82% of children with learning disabilities have been bullied at school
3. 44% of middle school kids experience bullying problems
4. 43% of kids fear harassment in the bathroom at school
5. 40% of children with Autism have been bullied at school

What about Cyber Bullying?
1. 35% of kids have been threatened online
2. 43% of kids have been bullied while online
3. 58% have not told their parents or an adult

The venues of cyber bullying are:

• Photo/video sharing
• Phone calls
• Email
• Chat rooms
• Instant Messaging
• Websites

Warning signs your child is being bullied:
1. Disconnects from people and isolates themselves
2. Physical problems such as headaches and stomachaches
3. Difficulty concentrating
4. Difficulty in falling asleep or staying asleep. Experiences frequent nightmares.
5. Seems listless, unenthusiastic, and disheartened in many aspects of life
6. Hyper-vigilant, extremely nervous, depressed or emotionally explosive

The effect of bullying:
1. 4,400 deaths per year, according to the CDC
2. 14% of high school students have considered suicide
3. 7% have attempted it
As you can see, bullying is a very serious problem.

Talk to your kids about what to do if they should be bullied and make sure you recognize changes in your child’s behavior that indicate they are being bullied.
Author Bio:
Jason Miner an expert freelance writer loves writing articles on different categories. He is approaching different bloggers to recognize each other’s efforts through “www.blogcarnival.com”. He can be contacted through e-mail at jasonminer8atgmaildotcom.

Starting School Without Being Afraid Of Bullies

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

Starting School Without Being Afraid Of Bullies

Teaching children proper protocol for handling school bullies is a complex issue today. Increasingly, parents find themselves trying to protect their children from bullying personalities and worry about their child’s safety. Ultimately, it is children who must cope with the difficulties of exposure to unacceptable bully behavior. Parents need to reduce their child’s fears before they can help them avoid problems with bullies.

There are several points to consider so children can start school without fear of bullies:
1. Address children’s’ fears
2. Provide safety guidelines
3. Clarify Children’s’ Options
4. Teach Bully Awareness

1. Address Children’s’ Fears
The most important aspect of providing a child with quality of life is to help them live with less fear. Discuss their fears openly and with understanding.

2. Provide Safety Guidelines
Children need to know when they are in danger. Most important is their need to know how to protect themselves from bullies.

3. Clarify Children’s’ Options
When they are exposed to a bully, children need to think first about their options. Help your child to know the options available to them to protect themselves and to insure their safety.

4. Teach Bully Awareness
Children need to be sensitized to aggressive behavior that goes beyond the bounds of normal. They need to be taught to identify what constitutes bullying.

Reducing the sting of the fear of bullies helps children recognize their own strengths. Help children to build a healthy sense of self-confidence and self-identity. They do this by reinforcing their sense of community and affability with others in their social networks. Children who build strong bonds of friendship are less likely to be targets of bullies. The axiom, “There is safety in numbers,” should be pointed out to children so they understand the importance of their personal friendships as a unifying part of their lives.

Inevitably, every child faces a bully sooner or later. Preparing a child for this possibility may prevent a serious situation. Expose them to books and venues that reinforce their preparation for a bullying episode. Less fearful, self-confident children who are fully oriented to their options may still recoil from a bully. With regular support and awareness, children will survive a bullying episode and know the proper methods to protect themselves.

It’s important to point out to children that a school bully is just a child like them. The menacing behavior of a bully is less dangerous when the bully realizes other children are prepared to isolate aggressive behavior and report their bullying. A bully may not express concern for his/her unacceptable behavior. When consequences for that behavior are consistent, bullying can be less of a problem.

 

About the Author:

 

This guest post is contributed by Debra Johnson, blogger and editor of full time nanny.

She welcomes your comments at her email Id: – jdebra84 @ gmail.com.